A Pacifist Critique of Gandhi

Authors: Sam Diener

Sam Diener is Co-Editor of Peacework.

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To make a hero out of someone dehumanizes them almost as much as demonizing them does. It serves no one to turn Mohandas Gandhi into a plaster saint (or a stone ganesh).

Many of Gandhi’s statements and actions were reprehensible, some of which are mentioned elsewhere in this issue (such as the treatment of his children, see page 10). There isn’t space for a full critique, but a few themes are important to mention. One of Gandhi’s contributions to nonviolent thought is the idea that a true dedication to nonviolence requires striving for the complicated truth. As we appreciate Mohandas Gandhi’s many contributions to the development of nonviolent struggle, we can’t, if we are to appraise his legacy honestly, ignore his faults as well.

Misogyny

Gandhi campaigned vigorously to include women in every non-cooperation campaign, and organized against purdah. Yet, Gandhi, in his old age, regularly slept naked next to young girls, including his nieces, in order, he said, to test his commitment to brahmacharya, or celibacy. No matter how some try to contextualize these actions, from my perspective, he was abusing these girls.

Editor's Note: The following additional paragraph was edited from the printed version for reasons of space:

At least two of Gandhi's associates, temporary editors of the Gandhian paper, Harijan, resigned because of their opposition to the practice, and Gandhi's Bengali translator, Nirmal Kumar Bose, also submitted a letter of resignation after failing to persuade Gandhi to stop what he saw as abuse. (See Gandhi, A Life, by Yogesh Chadha, 1997, pp. 423-428). In Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope, in a very brief discussion of it, Judith Brown claims Gandhi stopped the practice "in the face of this disquiet." (p. 378). But Yogesh Chadha implies the reverse, that he was committed to continuing it as a yajna (sacrifice, or penance), despite the protests.

His views about rape were misogynist. Gandhi wrote in Harijan, for example, that women “must develop courage enough to die rather than yield to the brute in man.” Gandhi claimed, if women are fearless, “However beastly the man, he will bow in shame before the flame of her dazzling purity.”

Gandhi opposed contraception (he had a famous debate with Margaret Sanger on the subject). His “idealization” of women as being superior at self-sacrifice, a quality he saw as being required of satyagrahis, is another form of stereotyping (See also Starhawk's trenchant feminist critique of Gandhian self-sacrifice in this issue).

Editor's Note: the following source note was edited out of the printed version for reasons of space. Quotations are from Lynne Shivers essay, "An Open Letter to Gandhi" in the invaluable but alas out of print book, Reweaving the Web of Life: Feminism and Nonviolence, New Society Publishers, 1982.

Racism

Gandhi often utilized racist arguments to advance the cause of Indians in South Africa. For example, addressing a public meeting in Bombay on September 26, 1896, following his return from South Africa, Gandhi said, “Ours is one continued struggle against degradation sought to be inflicted upon us by the European, who desire to degrade us to the level of the raw kaffir, whose occupation is hunting and whose sole ambition is to collect a certain number of cattle to buy a wife with, and then pass his life in indolence and nakedness.” (Collected Works, Volume II, page 74). The word kaffir (or keffir) is a derogatory term used in South Africa for native Africans. Gandhi never, as far as I’ve read, publicly opposed the racist oppression of black Africans in South Africa.

Pacifism?

Gandhi was, at best, an inconsistent pacifist, in the sense of opposing all wars, a fact pointed out by pacifists such as Bart de Ligt in the 1930s. Gandhi supported the British war effort in several wars, including the Boer War, the Zulu Rebellion (though he later came to believe the British were wrong in that struggle), and World War I. His role was mainly to organize and participate in ambulance corps, but his personal participation earned him the British Empire’s War Medal. Even after he proclaimed “war is wrong, is an unmitigated evil,” he defended his participation based on his perceived “duty as a citizen of the British Empire.” He acknowledged that he was “guilty of the crime of war,” and eventually repudiated the Empire, but didn’t repudiate his actions. (See Gandhi on War and Peace, by Rashmi-Sudha Puri).

Caste-Based Worldview

While Gandhi undeniably campaigned vigorously against untouchability, Dalit leaders such as Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar opposed the use of Gandhi’s term for “untouchables” (“harijan,” or “children of god”) as condescending, and claimed Gandhi never fully renounced a caste-based worldview.
Contemporary peace and social justice movements are still struggling to overcome misogyny, racism, the call of nationalist duty, and oppression based on caste and class. Applying the best of Gandhian principles of nonviolence helps us compassionately critique the actions of Mohandas Gandhi the person, and ourselves.


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